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<br /> <b>Notice</b>: dsiht:1$content=Artist Babs Haenen works with colored porcelain slabs and builds organic vessels with a dynamic inner choreography. Her new work on exhibition at Rotterdam's Galerie VIVID (April 27 - June 15, 2014) has shown the artist moving from vertical vessel forms to more complex works that are composed of various layers, creating colorful porcelain sculptures that refer to Chinese mountains and the ancient tradition of scholars' rocks. This work hovers above the line of art and craft, drawing its power from both. Scholars' Rocks is the most common English name given to the small, individual stones that have been appreciated by educated and artistic Chinese at least since the Song dynasty (960-1270). They evolved from appreciation of the larger garden rocks, but their smaller size enabled the Chinese literati to carry them indoors where they could be admired and meditated over in their sparse studios. Scholar's Rocks (or Gongshi) began as stones that resembled or represented mythological and famous in <b>/var/www/cfileonline.org/public_html/wp-includes/shortcodes.php</b> on line <b>398</b><br /> <br /> <b>Notice</b>: dsiht:1$ignore_html=1 in <b>/var/www/cfileonline.org/public_html/wp-includes/shortcodes.php</b> on line <b>399</b><br /> <br /> <b>Notice</b>: dsiht:1$tagnames=Array ( [1] => caption ) in <b>/var/www/cfileonline.org/public_html/wp-includes/shortcodes.php</b> on line <b>400</b><br /> <br /> <b>Notice</b>: dsiht:2$textarr=Array ( [0] => Artist Babs Haenen works with colored porcelain slabs and builds organic vessels with a dynamic inner choreography. Her new work on exhibition at Rotterdam's Galerie VIVID (April 27 - June 15, 2014) has shown the artist moving from vertical vessel forms to more complex works that are composed of various layers, creating colorful porcelain sculptures that refer to Chinese mountains and the ancient tradition of scholars' rocks. This work hovers above the line of art and craft, drawing its power from both. Scholars' Rocks is the most common English name given to the small, individual stones that have been appreciated by educated and artistic Chinese at least since the Song dynasty (960-1270). They evolved from appreciation of the larger garden rocks, but their smaller size enabled the Chinese literati to carry them indoors where they could be admired and meditated over in their sparse studios. Scholar's Rocks (or Gongshi) began as stones that resembled or represented m in <b>/var/www/cfileonline.org/public_html/wp-includes/shortcodes.php</b> on line <b>408</b><br /> <br /> <b>Notice</b>: dsiht:9$content=Artist Babs Haenen works with colored porcelain slabs and builds organic vessels with a dynamic inner choreography. Her new work on exhibition at Rotterdam's Galerie VIVID (April 27 - June 15, 2014) has shown the artist moving from vertical vessel forms to more complex works that are composed of various layers, creating colorful porcelain sculptures that refer to Chinese mountains and the ancient tradition of scholars' rocks. This work hovers above the line of art and craft, drawing its power from both. Scholars' Rocks is the most common English name given to the small, individual stones that have been appreciated by educated and artistic Chinese at least since the Song dynasty (960-1270). They evolved from appreciation of the larger garden rocks, but their smaller size enabled the Chinese literati to carry them indoors where they could be admired and meditated over in their sparse studios. Scholar's Rocks (or Gongshi) began as stones that resembled or represented mythological and famous in <b>/var/www/cfileonline.org/public_html/wp-includes/shortcodes.php</b> on line <b>492</b><br /> Exhibition | Babs Haenen at Galerie VIVID | CFile - Contemporary Ceramic Art + Design
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